tjduavis.JourneyMan

weblog dedicated to software development, philosophy, and theology


Redux

I’ve always seem to have many goals  – sometimes too much for my own good. Professional goals are just one set of categories that I’ve seem to continually define and classify.

Restarting this blog, which has its inception in my senior college years, represents a start of the goals that I look or hope to achieve. Some examples include establishing my software development toolkit which allows me to learn, explore and practice industry trends and professional techniques. This toolkit or libraries will contain “kitchen sink” or “hello world” samples which will showcase and re-enforce my understanding and skill. The other would be the journey and growth that comes with contributing to software projects of all kind – open source, work related, or other personal start up ambitions.

The blog will, although is meant to be professionally related, will contain an underlying theme of philosophy and theology as wisdom and the knowledge and understanding of God is imperative in my professional work.  Christ has and continues to become the foundation to not only my personal but professional development.

I’ll end with this reference when studying the topic of God’s purpose vocation at my Bible Study group last year with my beloved local church. The study material used was Timothy Keller’s Every Good Endeavour. Keller’s analogy of Tolkien’s short story the Leaf by Niggle impacted me about the natural struggle of vocational goals, purpose, and longings both in dancing between vanity and virtue.

The Bible teems with wisdom, resources, and hope for anyone who
is learning to work, looking for work, trying to work, or going to
work. And when we say that the Christian Scriptures “give us hope”
for work, we at once acknowledge both how deeply frustrating and
difficult work can be and how profound the spiritual hope must be
if we are going to face the challenge of pursuing vocation in this
world. I know of no more provocative witness to this hope than the
overlooked little story by J.R.R. Tolkien “Leaf by Niggle.”

Introduction, Every Good Endevaor – Timothy Keller

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